Maintaining Your Focus

Maintaining Your Focus

Is the ability to focus becoming a lost art?  Can we concentrate on just one thing at a time with laser intensity, full concentration, and attention? What do we achieve when we attempt to do that?

For years and to the point of becoming a trite assertion, many have boasted how they multitask successfully.  Yes, we can walk and chew gum at the same time. We can listen to a book while running or read a magazine while standing in line or twitter while watching television. In those cases, these tasks do not require our complete and sole attention, nor do we demand it from ourselves.

However, there are many instances where we are lead to believe that we can multitask where it is not possible to do so. For example, we cannot drive safely and text at the same time. In five seconds or less we can travel the length of a football field with little or any attention to oncoming traffic, passing vehicles, or the disabled vehicle whose driver just opened the car door to get out and check for a flat tire.  Both driving and texting require complete attention, if only briefly.

If you want to check on your ability to focus, try meditation.  Just for a short self-test, sit comfortably, close your eyes, and think about one thing and one thing only – perhaps a loved one or an object which is meaningful to you.  Do not move any part of your body. Time yourself either with a timer or just open your eyes when you are finished and evaluate how much time you spent.  Notice whether you were tempted to move your arms or legs. Did your eyes twitch or water? Did you get hot or cold, itchy? Did your mind wander?  How long did you meditate before you opened your eyes?

We all think that focusing is easy, that we do it all the time, but the fact is that most of us do not. When we try to still the mind, we are bombarded with other input from the senses. It is the same when we work, study, or attempt to concentrate on a task at hand. If you permit interruptions, your mind shifts from the task at hand to the interruption, and the interruption assumes primary importance.

Athletes succeed in part because they focus—they concentrate on what they need to achieve, e.g., the next turn in the pool, the point where the football needs to go, the next hurdle, the passing of a baton, the basket where the free throw has to land, the bulls-eye in the target, the cadence of pedaling, etc.

If you want to be successful, however you may define it, one thing in your toolkit should be the ability to focus—to set a goal and remain steadfast in moving toward it, allowing lesser distractions to fall by the wayside.  Practice your ability to focus and be clear about what is important to you to accomplish, and you will find that you will achieve more in less time.

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Keeping Up With Your Competition

Keeping Up With Your Competition

Whether your competition is another business or organization, your best friend or someone who competes in your sport, etc., you can be certain that someone will always be interested in learning more about them and you. That curiosity may result in an electronic search for you and your competition. You may even compete with yourself and also do searches on yourself to verify the accuracy of the information, look for individuals who might share all or part of your name, or look at your rankings and your scores on various social media platforms or networks.

Social Media Considerations

Regardless, you have to determine how and where you want to be represented. Do you establish a presence on a particular social media platform just to have a presence or just because your competition has a presence already? Do you register domain names that are even close to your name or close to your competition’s just to protect them from being purchased and used by your competition? Do you post on blogs daily, weekly, monthly, or just when you have something significant to comment on even though your competition may have a blog presence?  Are you negative on your social media postings (negative campaigning for example)?  Are you concerned about taking public positions which might be unpopular?

Technology and Software Considerations

 Do you believe that you have to have the latest technology or software to keep up with your competition? Do individuals put pressure on you to purchase certain brands? Do you sign up in advance for the latest cell phone or stand in long lines to purchase a new cell phone even though you just got your current cell phone last year? Do you brag about your company’s technological “superiority” or that you are always on the cutting edge?

Other Considerations

Do you have to have the most expensive celebrity named sneakers just to make a statement or to believe that you fit in with the popular crowd? Are you afraid to confess your faith because you might be the butt of jokes? Are you concerned about speaking up in meetings, in school, to your colleagues and friends just because you might make a mistake?  Do you walk, talk, and carry yourself with confidence regardless of who is around you. Do you step out in confidence even though your competitor may be more technologically advanced, smarter, more attractive, have a better web site, etc.?

You are the Best

Regardless of your competition, you are the best. You are a unique individual, corporation or organization. With 7 billion people in the world, there is room for you and your competitor. All you have to do is be the best you. You can do that without having the latest whatever and without being negative. Be confident, energetic, and enthusiastic, and people will be drawn to you because they will know that you care. It doesn’t matter whether everyone agrees with your beliefs. Differences are part of humanity.  Your competition just makes you stronger.

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Taking Public Positions on Controversial Issues on Social Media

Taking Public Positions on Controversial Issues on Social Media

Whenever something important occurs in the realm of politics, or news, or religion, many people who are in the habit of using the Internet are tempted to react to that occurrence by logging onto the Internet, and publishing their opinions. There is an immediacy associated with blogs and online forums that can tempt people who want their opinions to be known. Social media – including Facebook and Twitter – make it easy for us to respond to events in an immediate and public manner. This can be good in the sense that it hastens our interactions (assuming that haste is what we might call a ‘virtue’ in this context). But it can also be dangerous, or risky, for several reasons.

When we respond quickly to events that our happening in our world, we are able to increase the speed with which our conversations with colleagues take place. For example, our peers might read something we have written, and want to interact with us, and so they might respond with a written remark in the ‘comments’ section of our blog post. And yet, are we making the smartest or wisest decision when we so quickly take a public stance on a controversial issue? What if, by responding quickly in an online forum or on a blog, we fail to take the time to fully think through the problem at hand? What if, had we given ourselves more time to think, we had produced a more reasonable opinion, or stance?

And even if we do take our time to think through our position, a public stance can easily be criticized. Once something is written on the Internet, either by us or by someone else, it is there forever. Even if we decide to delete a blog post, or a comment in which we have taken a stance on a controversial issue, someone else might already have decided to take a screen shot of what we said. This means that even though it is deleted from our webpage or website, it still exists in cyberspace; someone else has a picture of it – an image. They can copy and paste it, post it on Facebook, spread it via other online platforms, like Twitter. In other words, there is always the chance that somebody might draw unwanted publicity to opinions, or stances, we reveal online.

This doesn’t mean we should never take public stances. Just like in the real world (or in everyday interactions with people) we should think before we speak, or write. We should consider carefully what we truly believe about a particular controversial issue. We should also weigh the pros and cons involved in making our beliefs public. Sometimes it is worth it to let other people know how we feel about an issue. Other times it is better, or wiser, to keep our opinions private. You never know how your words can be used, or manipulated, by someone who wants to make you appear in an unfavorable light. It is better, then, to pause, or hesitate, in order to reflect on your own thoughts before you take any action in the online world.

Whenever a controversial issue comes to your attention, and you want to make your opinion about it known, sit down and type out your opinion in an Office document, as opposed to writing it directly into a blog, or a comments section. This way, instead of immediately publishing your reaction to the controversial issue, you can step away from the writing for a few minutes (or perhaps longer) before you actually publish it. It is a good idea, whenever you write something, to step away from it for a while, and come back to it with fresh eyes. This helps you see what you have written with more clarity. You are able to see if you have said what you meant to say. You allow the initial emotion – anger, perhaps, or excitement – under which you composed the piece of writing, to wear off. And you are able to see your opinion, or your stance, in the ‘cold light of day.’

Only then, if you still are sure you want to take a public stance on an issue, should you publish the piece on a social media site. Remember that words, when written – either on paper or on a computer screen – have a certain power and effect. People remember them.

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Do New Technologies Produce Better Social Networking Results?

Do New Technologies Produce Better Social Networking Results?

There are now many forms of technology that attempt to produce the kind of social networking results that we, as business people, want to see. But is one form of technology preferable to others? With all the different hardware and software being created for the sole purpose of allowing social networking to take place, how does one know which applications or products are worthwhile or trustworthy?

 For example, many people use Skype or video chat to conduct meetings. There is convenience in being able to connect, visually, with a person or party with whom you conduct business. Maybe you are located in a different city from the person or party with whom you need to speak, and maybe you would like to conduct a face-to-face meeting. A flight to another city for that meeting would be an expense that is hard to justify, yet a telephone call would not seem adequate; it would not be enough. Perhaps bar graphs and other visual aids are part of the meeting, so that you and the other person need to see each other. Or perhaps it is not a business meeting, but rather an opportunity to meet a colleague for the first time. Instead of meeting for coffee or dinner, to discuss possibilities for working together in the future (the way colleagues used to), someone suggests a video chat.

These video conferences might be a good idea, but in some ways they cannot replace in-person, or face-to-face, meetings. The reason for this is that there is much that goes on between two people when they meet in person that cannot be replicated through even the most sophisticated social networking technology. Body language and gestures and facial expressions are all important components of daily life; they are also essential to meetings that occur between people who are trying to connect with colleagues. Social networking has always been important, as long as there have been people engaged in the act of business, or simply getting things done. The problem with conducting our meetings online is that we are not able to sense all the things we would sense in person.

The point is that not only do you have to find the technologies and applications that work for you, but you also have to learn when it is best to use those technologies, and when it is best to forgo those technologies, and instead implement an old-fashioned, face-to-face meeting. A person who has a laptop, and is stuck at an airport, for instance, might want to conduct that video meeting that he might otherwise have conducted in-person. But a person who is in an office downtown, and who has time to venture out and meet a colleague for a drink or for coffee, might choose to do just that, even if he or she has at his disposal the kind of technology that would allow that meeting to take place online.

This question – about when to use technology and when not to – is about discretion, really, rather than about what is most convenient. You have to have a sense for what kind of social networking is most appropriate for which kinds of situations. People learn this kind of thing with practice, but as social networking technologies continue to proliferate, it can become confusing.

Choose the kinds of technologies you are most comfortable with using. If you don’t feel comfortable with a certain hardware or software, don’t use it for those occasions when you need to interact with people in a networking situation. The more comfortable you are, the more comfortable they will be.

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Don’t Depend on Social Media

Don’t Depend on Social Media

 We all have heard various stories of how a video upload went viral, resulting in 15 minutes of fame for some person or thing, or giving someone a boost in business or a career. It is common knowledge that recent political events, elections, and movements and causes have been greatly influenced by, and even had their genesis in, social media. The quest for fame or recognition may spur some to post photos, information, or videos which others might consider inflammatory or inappropriate. The concept that social media is “the” way to make a statement or make a difference can be accurate, and is certainly not an unreasonable conclusion. However, it is not the only way to make a statement.

Entertainers, recognizable brands, politicians, corporate leaders, causes, and non-profits do not always depend on social media as their main presence. Social media is a complement—not an end-all. It is only one avenue to reach out with a message.

There are many reasons to not depend on social media.

  1.  Social  Media by its very nature is not dependable.  For example, social media networks may or  may not survive; they may morph into something completely different, or may change the rules on privacy, control, participation, advertising, etc. without your input or ability to participate in the decision; they may make changes without obtaining your consent to certain variables with which you do not agree.
  2. Social  media is cookie-cutter media. It dictates the format you must use for your  message, right down to the size of images, the number of characters in a  posting, the links you are permitted to include, if any, etc..
  3. Social  media permits the existence of look-alikes, similar names, redundant postings, and positive or negative information, which may not be accurate.
  4. Social  media is a time-consumer. It can take your time and that of your audience, without financial consideration or regard for the potential lack of any significance  or interest on your part. It becomes a form of spam management when you have to weed through feeds containing content from individuals with whom you may be connected, but whose postings hold no interest for you and whose postings may have minimal value to most readers.
  5. Social media provides no guarantee that it contains appropriate or accurate information  or actions. It has no fact-checking capabilities, it may contain both  accurate and inaccurate information, and it is incapable of any “feeling” or foresight as to consequences.
  6. Social  media is transient at best. It is profit-driven and carries an expectation of results by its users.  If the media (organization, group, forum, etc.) is controlled by a single individual it may be subject to key-man issues. For example, if it is a key-man situation, and that individual abandons or discontinues activity on that media for any reason, the media operated by that individual may collapse unless formal arrangements had been made for its continuation or dissolution.
  7. Social media does not control the actions of others. It is not designed to protect your interests or ensure that your intentions are carried out. It cannot control who requires or steals access to your password. It is blind to who accesses your private information. If the appearance of authority  is present, it obeys, or obliges.
  8. Social  media cannot guarantee that an appropriate audience will see your message. At best it serves to facilitate the promotion of your message, but it alone cannot control who receives that message or what is done with it once received.

Social media can be a tool for business, or a tool for personal promotion and the accessing of information. At worst, any particular network, forum, or web site, is a tool that can be here today or gone tomorrow. Use social media wisely as what you post is not always retractable. Do not depend on it as your sole delivery mechanism, or assume that it will maintain its current configuration permanently or even long-term.

Social media is not your friend, your marketing agency, your salesman, your hiring official, your club, your organization, or your confidant. It is simply a form of media – just like television, magazines, radio, and newsprint.  Its reach may be extensive or limited, but it is just media. Don’t depend on social media to be “forever.”  Developed and controlled by people, it is subject to change. Don’t discount it, but use it with the expectation that you will have to adapt to it; it will not adapt to you.

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Storing Private Information Online

Storing Private Information Online

Not long ago, people kept their important private information in file cabinets, in the safety of their homes or their businesses.  They kept hard copies – actual paper documents, or photographs – in places where they could actually hold them in their own two hands.  When they needed or wanted to share them with someone – a friend or a business acquaintance – they met those people in person.  Thus, they were able to maintain for this information a degree of privacy.  They knew who owned the information, and who had access to it.  The internet, however, is changing that.  Although some people still keep hard copies of their private information, others are beginning to store much of their private information online, in what is known as ‘cloud computing’ or ‘hosting’.  This comes with both conveniences and hazards.

The most obvious example of an online forum where private information is hosted, and shared, is Facebook.  One of the great innovations of Facebook is that it allows people who are separated by distance to keep in touch.  Family members can share their news with each other.  Friends who have fallen out of touch can connect with each other again. But when we talk about ‘posting’ our news or photos, whether it be on Facebook or some other platform, we are talking about electronic data; and not only is electronic data susceptible to deletion – either accidental or intentional – but in some cases it can be subject to questions of ownership.

Who owns the information we post on social networking sites? This question might have an answer, but sometimes the answer is complex, or dependent on legal or contractual circumstances.  Sometimes the answer changes in order to reflect the most current legislation, or the ‘fine print’ contained in any given site’s contract.  What this means is that the individual citizen needs to be aware of what kind of information he or she is sharing, whether or not this information needs to be ‘backed up’ (either in hard copy, or on a separate PC or external hard drive), and how trustworthy or reliable is the hosting site in question.

Consider the recent history of the internet in general, and social networking sites in particular.  In the scheme of things, the internet is still in its beginnings.  Culturally, we are still figuring it out.  It has forced other technologies to change, and advances in other technologies consistently force it to change.  While this development is good (in that it stimulates innovation), it also means that a degree of instability is involved.  And when you have instability, you have the possibility that certain ventures might be unsustainable.

Many ‘startup’ ventures fail, or simply are unable to keep pace with competition.  MySpace and Friendster, for example, were social networking sites that once predated, or rivaled, Facebook in terms of popularity, but which have since declined in membership.  Friendster has even been redesigned in recent years form a social networking site to a gaming site.  Facebook itself has faced questions about its users’ privacy.  Such instability begs the question: to what degree should we be relying on these systems for the adequate storing and retrieval of personal information.

One answer might be that the individual simply take care in his or her online interactions.  Do a little research before signing up, or joining, a networking site, whether it is for social or business purposes.  Be aware of what information you are storing, and where; be conservative, at least to begin, with what information you decide to share with others.  Be hesitant to dispose of hard copies, or electronic backup, of important information.  In time, you will begin to develop a sense for which sites are trustworthy.

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When More is Not Enough

When More is Not Enough

Perhaps you have reached the point that you are so “connected” that keeping up with networks, connections, and groups is becoming increasingly more of a responsibility than a benefit. You may be experiencing that level of personal commitment where you question the benefits of social media entirely. Often, you will hear evangelists speak of the value of personal connections and that electronic communication is not a substitution for face-to-face meeting.

Do not get caught up in the concept that you have an equal responsibility to each of your networks, groups, or connections. You do not need to visit each segment of your on-line presence each day. However, if you do chose to make a commitment to an individual, group, or network, keep that commitment. Without a personal interaction, all you have on-line is your word—your reputation.

It is possible that even with all your connections or linkages to individuals that more is not enough. Adding more and more connections, groups or networks is not the answer to developing a stronger business or increased personal satisfaction and joy. More may not be
enough.  In general, individuals grow networks and connections quickly, and then slow down. In some cases, these individuals begin to receive requests from their connections which are not relevant to the reason that they connected with those individuals. You must remember that other individuals may agree to connect with you or reach out to connect with you for reasons different from your reasons.

You may be connecting with individuals solely to be able to reach a larger audience. That is not by itself an inappropriate reason. However, do not be surprised if the connections you make turn out to add you to mailing lists, hit you with sales pitches, ask you for referrals and
recommendations, or boast about the number of their connections. These individuals
are truly part of the more is not enough syndrome in the race to be the individual with the most connections or the most successful connections. Think of these individuals as the users in your network—they come with the approach of connecting for the sake of connecting to others, similar to you potentially.

You can decide to move quickly or slow in the social media space. People may make demands of you but that does not mean that you have to respond to those demands unless you made a personal commitment to do so. You do not have to add every group, app, or individual recommended to you. You do not have to provide referrals or recommendations unless you chose to do so. You do not need to respond within 24 hours or less to everything that
everyone sends to you. You do not need to read every email in its entirety.  Your more – whatever that is – may not be enough. You have to evaluate whether more will deliver your enough or whether quality instead of quantity needs to be part of the mix.

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Moving to Mobile

Moving to Mobile

You may be a part of one of the growing segments who rely on mobile technology for rapid communication–voice or text or email. Web sites and apps are in a quick ramp-up mode to accommodate your need for immediate access. Many social applications that deliver services such as appointment setting, weather, reservations, books, delivery of items, traffic, news, etc., all are mobile worthy. Such access supports the individual who operates in the “I need it now,” “I need it on the road,” and I have to be part of the “multi-tasker” world, either by choice or by occupation.

It is a fast-paced option for information. However, it is not without logistical hazards. You may not have full access when traveling abroad, or in tunnels, subways, cruise ships, or buildings that block
access structurally or intentionally. It has social implications from restrictions on using mobile technology while driving, speaking in public places, or taking calls or messaging while at dinner, as examples. Many individuals consider it rude to use mobile devices in restaurants, movies, or
other entertainment venues, and the range of volume in ring tones, and voices contributes to that determination. In addition, there is always the simple issue of being able to see  the device
and information, to quickly take notes, or share documents when using a mobile device in a conversation and to be able to flip between referenced sources, all while coping with background noise.

There is a reduction in dependence on desktop computers because of the reliance on mobile devices. However, mobile technology is currently an enhancement to productivity when someone does not have access to desktop capabilities and needs that access. Applications such as Access, Excel, Adobe Creative Suite, or Final Cut do not lend themselves to mobile applications for large jobs or major creative work. Individuals using two or three screens or more in their work are not going to be able to be as productive on the road with a simple mobile device, no matter how sophisticated. Corporate systems with multiple programs have not made most of their systems available for mobile access due to security considerations.

The necessity in business of melding records from social media networks and online written communication and file-sharing providers into corporate record-keeping systems persists. Strides have been made in merging calendars, email, and contacts. However, the substance of  collaborating online, as well as adding and retaining records in corporate systems remains elusive.

Desktop computers will remain, even if the desktop used is a docked laptop, but it is a pleasure to be a part of this technology evolution and watch the issues resolve.

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Choosing the People You Connect With Online

Choosing the People You Connect With Online

Social networking is all about creating relationships. By connecting with people online, you are entering into relationships. This begins with the first contact and the first reply. Some of these relationships might be more fruitful or productive than others, but most have the potential to have some degree of productivity. Your success with online connections depends on how well these relationships are managed.

Managing your online connections means understanding the way they work. There are similarities between online connections and what we might refer to as ‘real world’ connections. Like the ‘real world’, the online world has its hazards; in the same way that you are careful about who you associate with at work, or in your neighborhood, you ought to be careful about who you associate with online.

You don’t need to share all the same interests with another person in order to establish a productive online connection. As long as the context in which you are associating limits or shapes your contact in an appropriate way, then you should allow yourself a generous amount of freedom to initiate, or respond to, potential online connections. For example, if you are a businessperson who is involved in a specific industry, you might want to make connections with another person involved in that industry, even though the two of you have little else in common. The proper social networking platform will allow this connection to take place.

This is one of the reasons social networking platforms are popular. They offer a structured meeting place for people who might not otherwise meet. In the ‘real world’, you are sometimes prevented by
distance, or by superficial differences, from connecting with people with whom you have something fundamental in common. As long as the platform in question safeguards each user’s privacy, and allows users to determine the degree to which connections can interact with them, the platform is trustworthy.

This does not mean you should approach all social networking sites equally, or that you should trust everyone who contacts you via a platform. Anyone would be wise to develop conservative or reticent habits in their online interactions. Correspond slowly, and carefully, with your online connections, making sure that their intentions are what they appear to be. Once you have established a rapport with a connection, and vice versa, you might find that you have discovered a valuable resource.

Also, remember that most social networking platforms allow users to add or delete connections; if you want to change the status of one of your connections, you can do so quite easily. A person with a reliable online presence will not pretend to be someone he or she is not. If you feel as though one of your connections is presenting him or her self in a manner that is inconsistent, or untrustworthy, you should not hesitate to cease contact with that person. Always interact in a professional manner when dealing with colleagues.

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Does the Constant Change in Technology Paralyze You?

Does the Constant Change in Technology Paralyze You?

How many times have you purchased a device or piece of technology – a computer, a cellular phone, a digital camera – only to discover that a new or updated version of that product will soon be released by the manufacturer? You only need to remember what personal computers looked like ten years ago to recognize the pace at which the tide of technology moves forward. Laptops and other kinds of hardware keep getting smaller and more convenient, while processers keep getting faster, and software keeps getting more efficient. The idea of ‘planned obsolescence’ is commonly accepted; in order to stay viable in a profit-driven market, companies design their own products to be modified or replaced. 

The effect on the consumer can be frustrating, even paralyzing. How do you know whether that laptop or smartphone you want to buy won’t be out-of-date within the next year? For consumers who are only minimally involved with technology, such a question might not be pressing. But as technology devices become more and more present in the work life of the ordinary citizen, the question becomes more relevant. 

It is important to decide what kind of device is necessary for you, what device is best suited to your needs. Try not to make the decision about what product to purchase based on fashions or trends. Remember that technology devices best serve us when we recognize them as objects of practicality; as items meant to help us more efficiently achieve our business-related objectives. What it looks like, and how popular it is, are not necessarily good indicators of a product’s usefulness to you. It is true that a device that happens to be fashionable might serve you best, but it is also true that, depending on your needs, a device that is less popular might be more useful to you. Don’t rush to buy a device simply because your colleagues own it. You might end up buying something that is almost obsolete. 

Do a little research before ordering your new technology device. Don’t be afraid to purchase a product simply because you have a hunch that one day it will be out-of-date. This is inevitable. But you will save yourself time and money in the end if you do some research in the beginning. Find out whether a new device in your area of interest has just been released, or whether one has been on the market for a while. Compare this device with similar devices marketed by competitors. Make a list of priorities, so that you know what you are looking for in your device, and make your decision based on that. The market for technology devices will always be changing, but don’t let that stop you from participating in it. If you think practically, you will make wise consumer decisions. 

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